HOME VIEW BY SUBJECT VIEW BY ARTIST ITEMS OF INTEREST CURRENT EXHIBITION CONTACT
HISTORY CATALOGUES
American & European Paintings - September 2008
 
 
painting
 
Maximilien Luce
(French, 1858–1941)
Bouquet of Flowers
Oil on paper, mounted on canvas: 16 1/4 × 20 3/4 inches
Signed at lower left: “Luce”
RS 5675


Maximilien Luce was born in Paris and trained as an engraver, a profession that he practiced with the firm of Froment in his native city and London. He became interested in the fine arts and studied painting at night, and worked in the studio of Emile-Auguste Carolus-Duran (1837–1917). Early in his career he was befriended by the famous impressionist Camille Pissarro (1830–1903) who had a strong influence on his artistic development. Luce, along with Paul Signac (1863–1935), founded the neo-impressionist style, whose adherents sought to define form by rendering the effects of light in broken color. Luce exhibited with the avant-garde “Indépendents,” showing mostly landscapes, but also producing figural compositions that depicted the lives of the poor. His involvement in social issues led him to participate in radical politics, which resulted in his imprisonment in the 1890s. During his long career Luce was a prolific painter and printmaker. He accepted an appointment to the presidency of the Société des Artistes Indépendents after Signac’s death in 1935, but resigned in protest against the anti-Semitic policies of the Vichy government.


  


Copyright©2008 The Schwarz Gallery

The Schwarz gallery is not responsible for any errors or omissions contained in this web site.