HOME VIEW BY SUBJECT VIEW BY ARTIST ITEMS OF INTEREST CURRENT EXHIBITION CONTACT
HISTORY CATALOGUES
Charles Lewis Fussell - September 2007
 
 
painting
 
Charles Lewis Fussell
(American, 1840–1909)
Fort Hamilton, Brooklyn, c. 1890
Oil on canvas, 8 × 11 1/2 inches
Signed and inscribed at lower left: “C.L. FUSSELL/FT. HAMILTON”
RS 2441


Fort Hamilton is located at a strategic position on the southwestern tip of Brooklyn, New York, at what is now the base of the Verrazano-Narrows Bridge. Early Dutch settlers found a Nyack Indian longhouse on the site and built a small blockhouse there to protect their community at New Utrecht. After seizing New Amsterdam from Holland in 1664, the British erected a fortification on the site called Fort Lewis, equipped with cannon powerful enough to challenge ships that passed through the Narrows.

Shortly after the War of 1812, the federal government decided to build a granite replacement for the old British fort. The cornerstone was placed on June 11, 1825, and six years later the new fort was ready to receive its garrison. Though references to the structure as “Fort Hamilton” occur as early as 1826, it was not officially named for the first secretary of the Treasury, Alexander Hamilton, until the twentieth century. Designed by Gen. Simon Bernard, Fort Hamilton was positioned so that its guns could supplement those of the nearby Fort Lafayette and protect the Narrows between Brooklyn and Staten Island. During the Civil War, Fort Hamilton and other fortifications on Staten Island protected New York Harbor against Confederate raiders.

The Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts owns three related views of Fort Hamilton that also date from around 1890.


  


Copyright©2007 The Schwarz Gallery

The Schwarz gallery is not responsible for any errors or omissions contained in this web site.