HOME VIEW BY SUBJECT VIEW BY ARTIST ITEMS OF INTEREST SELL US ARTWORK CONTACT
HISTORY CATALOGUES
Europeans & Americans Abroad; Philadelphia Collection 73; September 2004
 
 
painting
 
A. Frederick Tellander
(American, born 1878)
L’Arc de Triomphe de l’Étoile, Paris
Oil on canvas, 30 × 36 inches
Signed at upper right: “Frederick Tellander”


In 1806 Napoleon commissioned François Thérèse Chalgrin (1739–1811) to design a triumphal arch, based on those of ancient Rome, to commemorate the glory of his armies. One hundred and sixty-two feet high, it is the largest such monument in the world. It is covered by sculptural reliefs, the best-known of which is La Marseillaise by François Rude (1784–1855). The Arc de Triomphe de l’Étoile, which shelters France’s tomb of the unknown soldier, is the point at which twelve great radiating avenues converge, hence its sobriquet, “of the star.”

Born in Illinois, A. Frederick Tellander studied in Paris and Rome. He worked as an illustrator and exhibited throughout the Midwestern United States, especially at the Art Institute of Chicago, where he showed 93 works between 1910 and 1941. Of these, four—Boat Pond, Luxembourg Gardens (1927), Over the Seine to La Cité (1927), After Notre Dame, Thirty Minutes for Tea (1929), and Pont Neuf (1930)—were Parisian subjects.



Copyright ©2004 The Schwarz Gallery

The Schwarz gallery is not responsible for any errors or omissions contained in this web site.